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AP Literature & Composition

The Advanced Placement Literature class is for the self-motivated high school senior wishing to experience the rigors of a college literature class.  This challenging, fast-paced course will immerse students in scholarly writing and in-depth literary study and cover multiple types of literature spanning from Shakespeare’s time to our own.  Working knowledge of literary terms is expected, as are strong skills in writing, grammar, and vocabulary.  Approximately half the classes will be focused on literary analysis, while the other half will be spent in a writing and AP skills workshop.

It is recommended, but not required, to take the AP Literature test offered by the College Board in May.  Arrangements will need to be made with your local high school.  Students who achieve a certain score may receive college credit for their efforts; how much, if at all, is up to the college’s discretion.

Course Description

This AP Literature course will trace man’s relationship to the spiritual from the 15th century to the present.  The novels and plays have largely been selected from the Kolbe Recommended Reading List and most, but not all, have appeared on the AP Free Response Question at one time or another.  Selected short stories, essays, and poems often fit into this theme, but have mostly been chosen as excellent examples within the genre.  Due to their spiritual nature, three selections overlap with the Modern Lit course; however, the AP pace is accelerated and varying topics will be addressed:  Crime and Punishment (3 weeks instead of 7), Brideshead Revisited (3 weeks instead of 5), and The Waste Land (1 week instead of 2).

Students will become familiar with some of the major authors, poets, and essayists from Shakespeare’s time to our own.  Students will deeply analyze the author’s meanings through use of literary technique and their own insights and convey those insights through concise, thorough, scholarly writing.  In addition, students will identify the historical events that took place during the life of these writers and how these events have impacted their writing, have a greater understanding of the evolution of literary style and technique through the latter centuries; and recognize the impact of literature upon culture and spirituality and vice versa.

Course Expectations

Students can expect a significant weekly reading load of approximately 150 pages per week in addition to independent guided reading of assigned short stories, essays, and poems.  Students will be expected to prepare detailed notes for class to facilitate student-driven analysis and discussion.  Written homework, participation, papers (a variety of types:  analytic, creative, research, etc.), quizzes, and exams will occur with regularity.

Course Texts
  • The Hunchback of Notre Dame (Victor Hugo)
  • The Scarlet Letter (Nathaniel Hawthorne)
  • The Crucible (Arthur Miller)
  • Faust (Johann Goethe)
  • Crime and Punishment (Fyodor Dostoyevsky) ***
  • The Power and the Glory (Graham Greene)
  • The Waste Land (T.S. Eliot) ***
  • Brideshead Revisited (Evelyn Waugh) ***
  • The Chosen (Chaim Potok)
  • Man's Search for Meaning (Victor Frankl)
  • Brave New World (Aldous Huxley)

Assorted short stories, essays, and poetry to be determined.\

*** These books are also in Kolbe's Modern Literature course.

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Course Details:

Section Number

WCL-12AP-1

Instructor

Mrs. Crawford

Grades (Typical)

11-12th (12th)

Live Class Meets

2x per week

1 hr., 20 min each time

Day

Monday & Wednesday

Class Period

1

Regular Class Time

7:30 AM - 8:50 AM (Pacific)

10:30 - 11:50 AM (Eastern)

Tuition

$699

Honors/AP Fee

$149

Credits (Type)

10 (Literature)

Transcript Designation

AP

Companion Courses

Honors Morality & Church History III

Honors US & Modern History

Honors Creative Writing

Notes

Kolbe highly recommends taking this course

after 11th Grade Literature.