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High SCHOOL Curriculum

Science Curriculum

Introduction to Physics & Chemistry (IPC)

Course Texts:

Course Description:

Introduction to Physics & Chemistry (IPC) is a course that studies the fundamental principles of physical science which are so important for the in depth approach to the high school sciences of Biology, Chemistry, and Physics. Although the main emphasis in this course is on Chemistry and Physics, the same scientific thought processes and especially many of the Chemistry concepts, are applied and used fully in the high school Biology course as well. Any student wishing to pursue the Kolbe Academy Core or Honors high school science courses is encouraged to complete this course in order to put in place the math, analysis, and process skills necessary for success in those courses.

This course plan covers a breadth of material recommended both for eighth grade students interested in beginning honors science coursework in high school and for typical ninth grade science coursework. For students who do not have plans for honors science in high school, parents may wish to modify the course plan according to their child's abilities.

Ideally, IPC should be taken concurrently with Algebra I. However, strong math students will find that a pre-Algebra course provides most of the necessary math skills needed to complete this course successfully. Topics covered include an introduction to properties of matter, states of matter, atomic structure, the Periodic Table, chemical bonds, chemical reactions, solutions, acids and bases, forces and motion, forces in a fluid, work, power and machines, energy, thermal energy and heat, mechanical waves and sound, the electromagnetic spectrum and light, optics, electricity and magnetism.

Biology

Honors Designation Available

Course Texts:

Church Teaching Materials:

Course Description:

This course is designed to give students an appreciation of creation and of the order and complexity of living things. The course plans outline a track for a Kolbe Academy Core course (K) and a Kolbe Academy honors course (H) in Biology. The "Core Biology" track will emphasize the basic biological processes of how life systems work while the "Honors Biology" track will outline the more in depth physiological processes of life systems.

The science of biology presents the student with some of the bioethical issues that exist in today's world, such as stem cell research, genetic engineering, and cloning. It is the role of the parent to discuss these issues with the student and instruct the student in Church Teaching. We have done our best to point out these controversial issues and to provide guidance on how to address them. For example, the topic of evolution is studied alongside the Church's teaching in Humani Generis. Miller and Levine's Biology book periodically includes an "Issues in Biology" segment which should be used as points of discussion between the student and parent. It is important to bring in the Church's teaching on moral and bioethical issues during these discussions. Projects have been assigned during some weeks so that the student can explore the Church's teachings on controversial topics on their own.

The honors track, although up to the parent's discretion, is aimed for students who have previously had a solid background in physical science. A student who still wishes to pursue this course as an honors course that did not follow the recommended course of study for physical science, may find the pace of the course challenging. These students should be sure to allot extra time for their studies. The honors track should be followed if students wish to have the opportunity to take the AP test in Biology as most of the topics needed to be successful on the Biology AP exam are covered. Since this book is NOT a college text, it is important to study for the AP with an AP specified study guide for Biology. To see the AP Biology requirements, go to www.collegeboard.com.

This course is typically done in 9th or 10th grade and includes the following topics: the nature of life, ecology, cells, genetics, evolutionary theory, microorganisms and fungi, plants, invertebrates, chordates, and the human body. Lab work is suggested throughout the lesson plan through the use of the Virtual Lab CD and labs in the textbook that do not require extensive materials. Alternate labs from the textbook are suggested with every Virtual Lab assignment for students who wish to complete a hands-on lab using this text.

Chemistry (Option 1)

Honors Designation Available

Course Texts:

Course Description:

This course is designed to give students an appreciation of creation and of the order and complexity of atoms and their interactions with each other. The course plans outline a track for a Kolbe Academy Core course (K) and a Kolbe Academy honors course (H) in Chemistry. The "Core Chemistry" track will emphasize the basic chemical interactions between atoms, compounds, and molecules while the "Honors Chemistry" track will delve more deeply into the theoretical, mathematical, and organic chemical processes.

This course provides an introduction to chemistry suitable for students in a college preparatory program. The honors track, although up to the parent's discretion, is aimed for students who have previously had a solid background in physical science. A student who still wishes to pursue this course as an honors course that did not follow the recommended course of study for physical science may find that the pace of the course very quick and should be sure to allot extra time for their studies. The honors track should be followed if students wish to have the opportunity to take the AP test in Chemistry. Since this book is NOT a college text, it is important to study for the AP with an AP specified study guide for Chemistry. Most of the topics needed to be successful on the Chemistry AP exam are covered in the honors course of study. To see the AP chemistry requirements, go to www.collegeboard.com.

This course is typically done in 10th or 11th grade and includes the following topics: matter and change, scientific measurement, atomic structure, the Periodic Table, ionic, metallic, and covalent bonding, chemical names and formulas, balancing chemical equations, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, states of matter, gas behavior, water and aqueous systems, solutions, thermochemistry, reaction rates and equilibrium, acids, bases and salts, oxidation-reduction reactions, electrochemistry, hydrocarbon compounds, alcohols, ethers, carbonyl compounds, carbohydrates, amino acids, lipids, nucleic acids, and nuclear chemistry. Lab work is suggested throughout the lesson plan through the use of the Virtual Lab CD and labs in the textbook that do not require extensive materials. Alternately, a parent may choose to utilize the labs that occur in the textbook for lab credit.

Chemistry (Option 2)

Course Texts:

Course Description:

This course gives the student important, basic, and widely used terms and ideas, such as what are atoms and molecules, what is dissolving, what happens during chemical reactions, etc. It is recommended that a student have knowledge of elementary algebra. Answers are included in the text.  Topics include: Metric system, units, and measurement, density, temperature, pressure, and gas volume, temperature conversion, exponential notation, the atom and the periodic table, energy, ionic bonds, symbols and charges, writing formulas for ionic compounds, naming ionic compounds, covalent bonds, naming and writing formulas for covalent compounds, the coordinate covalent bond, names and formulas for the common acids, skeletal structural formulas, structures of some common covalent compounds, molecules, atomic, molecular and formula weights, mixtures, electronegativity and polar covalent bonds, oxidation number, oxidation and reduction, acids, bases, salts and dissolving, reading and writing chemical equations, predicting precipitates in chemical reactions, the mole, mole and gas density, mole and the chemical equations, concentration of solutions, molarity, and pH and neutralization power

Physics with Lab

Honors Designation Available

Course Texts:

*Kolbe Academy has made available to registered families ONLY the answer key to questions assigned within the scope of the following Kolbe Academy course plan.  See the course plan for details on accessing these materials.

Supplemental:

Course Description:

This course is designed to give an understanding of classical physics. Physics is the science of the natural laws of the physical universe, which, like the natural moral law, flow through creation, having as their origin the goodness of God. "The beauty of creation reflects the infinite beauty of the Creator and ought to inspire the respect and submission of man's intellect and will" (New Catechism of the Catholic Church 342).

Kolbe Core (K) Physics course of study: The Kolbe Core (K) is conceptual in nature and is recommended to students who may not be interested in pursuing science in college, but who would like to include physics in their high school course of study. Although the course is conceptual in nature, it does include physics rquations and some problem working. The chapters, sections, and problems assigned in this course of study mimic EXACTLY the previous Kinetic Books Conceptual Physics text that Kolbe has carried in previous years.  The physics topics included are mechanics, thermodynamics, mechanical waves, electricity and magnetism, light and optics.

PRE-REQUISITES: Algebra 1, Geometry, Intro to Physics and Chemistry.

Kolbe Honors (H) course of study: The Honors (H) course of study is designed for students who may have an interest in science, math, or engineering or for students who might prefer a more mathematical approach to physics in their high school course of study. While it is a more rigorous course of study than the Kolbe Core (K) course of study, it does not require the use of Calculus to

solve problems. This text is mentioned on the College Board website as appropriate for students preparing to take the AP© Physics B exam, and the Kolbe Honors (H) course of study adheres closely to the requirements for this exam.  Topics include mechanics, mechanical waves, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, light and optics, and an introduction to modern physics.

PRE-REQUISITES: Geometry, Algebra II, Intro to Physics and Chem, Chemistry. CO-REQUISITE: Trigonometry or PreCalculus.

Kolbe Academy recommends that Physics be taken by the high school student in 11th or 12th grade after the successful completion of Intro to Physics and Chemistry in 8th or 9th, Biology in 9th or 10th, and Chemistry in 10th or 11th. 

Astronomy

Course Texts:

Course Description:

The course is designed to give students an appreciation of the order and complexity of creation, and of the order and complexity in the cosmos. Revelation and science complement each other in illuminating God's glory. The course covers the different kinds of celestial objects, their characteristics, how they formed and developed, and their eventual fates. This includes a discussion of stars (including our sun), star groups, black holes, asteroids and comets, the earth, moon, and planets. It also covers the theories of the origin, development, and future of the universe, as well as whether other planets and life forms exist in space. The student will study, and have the opportunity to observe, the main stars and constellations for both summer and winter.

The workload may vary somewhat week to week. The course plans encourage the student to cover material by topic, which may provide a more thorough understanding of the concept. While some topics may be more simple and covered in less time, others are more complex and may require more of the student's time. A final research paper and oral presentation on an astronomy topic take the majority of the fourth quarter.

Kolbe Core (K) credit is available to those students that follow the course plan and turn in the appropriate sample work. This course is typically done as an elective science course in the 12th grade and includes the following topics: history of astronomy, modern astronomy, electromagnetic waves, the Universe, cosmology and theology, stars and constellations, sky observations, the Solar System: comets, meteors, asteroids, the moon, the earth, and the planets. Lab credit is not available with this course.

Anatomy and Physiology

Course Texts:

Course Description:

While the word "anatomy" is derived from the word for "dissection", this course will require little dissection. Instead, the student will study and benefit from the results of countless dissections that produced proper names and descriptions of the structures of the human body. Furthermore, the student will learn the function of these structures, properly known as the science of physiology and come to appreciate the complexity of God's creations. This course does touch upon some ethical issues present in today's society, including birth control, fertility drugs and in vitro fertilization and genetic engineering. The Hole's textbook periodically features a "Topic of Interest" note that should be used as topics of discussion between the parent and student. Later in the year, the student will use one of these ethical issues and focus on the Church's teachings concerning it in a short paper. This course suggests supplemental materials that focus on the Church's teachings when indicated to help guide both parent and student during such discussions.

Please note that this is a TRUE Anatomy and Physiology course. The textbook contains pictures and descriptions that may not be suitable for all students, particularly Chapters 19 & 20. Please be sure to review the course plan and textbook thoroughly before proceeding with the course. The textbook covers the material from a scientific and not a moral perspective. Kolbe Academy has included Church teaching to cover the moral perspective. We recommend this course for 12th Graders and more mature students who may be interested in the health sciences.

This course includes the following topics: Chemical Basis of Life, Cells and Cellular Metabolism, Tissues, Integumentary System, Skeletal System, Muscular System, Nervous System, The Senses, Endocrine System, Blood and the Cardiovascular System, Lymphatic System and Immunity, Digestive System and Nutrition, Respiratory System, Urinary System, Water, Electrolyte and Acid-Base Balance, Reproductive Systems, Pregnancy, Growth, Development and Genetics. Lab work is incorporated throughout the course and combines the Ph.I.L.S CD-ROM, the ARIS website and other activities as well. Many anatomy and physiology courses would allow for exploring bones, diagrams, and models during a lab section called a "practical." As home schooled students, these can be hard to come by! Therefore, the "practicals" will consist of labeling illustrations and lab reports should be written to reflect Kolbe's Guide to Writing a Lab Report.